Entries Tagged 'Politics Blogs' ↓

Celebrate Xmas and Trump courage

The local television commercial for the 2019 Charles Taylor annual Christmas dinner concludes with this invitation:

“Guest speaker and best-selling author, Sidney Powell, will have a Christmas card you can sign to thank President Trump for his courageous stands.” 

I was struck by this because, at first, I could not think of any courageous stands taken by the president. Then I started counting them:

  1. Trump described himself as a serial pussy grabber. Any teen-age boy will tell you that takes a lot of courage.
  2. According to a White House report, Trump recently warned Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov that Russia better not meddle in our next election. Russian television edited out footage of Putin quaking in his boots when he received the threat.
  3. Trump said he would shut down the government and take the blame. I guess it takes courage to shut down the organization you are hired to run.
  4. As commander-in-chief, Trump’s anti-immigrant policies have kept us safe from asylum-seeking children, who are now in cages across the nation. All Americans are sleeping better, now.

Or maybe it is only Americans who want to sign a Christmas card thanking the president for his courageous stands who are sleeping better.

The rest of us are tired of his despicable cowardice. 

The Divide

Here is John Dewey’s description of what Americans are taught to believe about democracy:

We have been taught not only in the schools but by the press, the pulpit, the platform, and our laws and law-making bodies, that democracy is the best of all social institutions. We may have so assimilated this idea from our surroundings that it has become an habitual part of our mental and moral make-up.

Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and Education. New York: Macmillan, p. 34.

More than 80 years have passed since Dewey described this quintessential American belief. The fact that we have rarely (if ever) challenged that belief is proof that it has become “part of our mental and moral make-up.”

And that belief relates to my suggestion for addressing our current political divide. Everyone, who writes about the divide, or who defends one viewpoint against the other, must start with one of the following sentences:

  1. “My side is not corrupt, but the other side is.”
  2. “My side is corrupt, but the other side is more corrupt.”
  3. “Both sides are equally corrupt.”
  4. “My side’s corruption is a good thing; the other side’s corruption is a bad thing.”

By starting with one of those sentences, writers/commentators put their argument in the context of what is true–that our system is corrupt in various ways; instead of what we cannot know to be true–that “democracy is the best of all social institutions.”

For more than 200 years we have failed to live up to the ideal of a fair, democratic system of governance. One reason is that we are in denial about systemic corruption. If we start by recognizing that every system of governance is corrupt (even American democracy), we could start building a more fair and just system of the people, by the people, and for the people.

If we don’t, our divide will grow as powerful actors continue to enrich themselves at the expense of those with less power, which is the definition of corruption.

Trump rally mix-up

The headline read:

“Trump slams security for being politically correct.”

The subhead read:

“The president wasn’t happy with one of the security guards assigned to his campaign rally in Pennsylvania on Tuesday night.”

My question is, “Why was anybody who cares about the well-being of others at a Trump rally?”

Hey Mick Mulvaney

Get over it! You screwed up.

Kavanaugh again

None of the accusations against Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh have been judged to be true. As I pointed out in a different blog, about a Cal Thomas editorial, however,

He (Cal Thomas) was arguing against re-opening the Kavanaugh background file. Why do Republicans refuse to hear under-oath testimony from anybody other than Kavanaugh and the accuser? Why isn’t Kavanaugh calling for testimony from others? Why isn’t he offering to take a lie-detector test?”

http://sixvirtues.com/blog/2018/09/30/fbi-investigations-and-politics/

Cristine Blase Ford took a lie detector test, and she passed. In other words, common sense tells us that Christine Blase Ford was telling the truth, even if “the rule of law” has not spoken.

Now we have new accusations against Kavanaugh, when he was at Yale.

Nothing will be done, but we need to put this in perspective:

Two of the six males on the Supreme Court have been credibly accused of either sexual harassment or assault. Apparently, Republicans can’t find male nominees to the Supreme Court who haven’t sexually harassed women in their thirties, or sexually assaulted them in high school and college. (BTW–Anita Hill passed a lie detector test, too. Clarence Thomas refused to take one.)

You gotta love that rule of law thing. Clarence and Bart are two more examples of its real purpose–to protect powerful, uneducated men– especially those who attended Yale law school. I love irony.

Attention NC Democrats

North Carolina House Republicans made the national news with their sneak vote to override the budget veto of Governor Cooper. Republicans in control of the House told democrats they would not hold any votes on Thursday, September 11. Therefore, democrats attended a 9/11 memorial service. The Republican leadership changed its mind, and the House voted to override the Governor’s veto because not enough democrats were there to vote.

The main question is, “When did Republican leaders change their mind?” The history of the Republican takeover of the state legislature tells us that they “changed their mind” long before September 11. NC Republicans are known for their strategies aimed at gaining political power–voter fraud, extreme gerrymandering (which they brag about), and voter suppression laws–to name a few.

Now it goes to the Senate. To complete the override Republicans need one Senate Democrat to vote with them. I plead with Democrats to take the following strategy:

  1. identify three Democratic Senators to convince Republican leadership they will vote to override the veto.
  2. Then, when the vote is taken, every one of them can say, “I thought I was going to vote to override, but I changed my mind.”

Republicans do whatever gets them what they want because their highest value is self-interest. How do you like your democracy, now?

Are we great again, yet?

Yes – the Democrats nominated a lousy candidate in 2016. Evidently, their party is so empty that they couldn’t find someone to defeat a narcissist.

But that is nothing compared to the Republicans. Evidently, they cannot find a candidate better than someone who displays all the vices of our uneducated nature — ignorance, intellectual incompetence, weak character, fear of truth, pride and selfishness.

The Democrats made a huge mistake in 2016. Short of death or illness, it is too late for Republicans to avoid the same one. Therefore, we will find out in November, 2020, if Americans once again choose to be governed by an uneducated, vicious person.

Test for Trump

The lead reads:

A group of immigrant workers fired from President Donald Trump’s golf clubs say they want to meet with him at the White House to make the case that they should not be deported.

Their request was in a letter, to which the White House responded, “we are reviewing your message.”

The article quotes Gabriel Sedano, who worked for Trump as a handyman for 14 years: “I’m hopeful that he’ll look at the letter. I believe he has a heart.”

Does Donald Trump have a heart? This should be an easy call. Who among us would deport people who worked for us for ten years or more? What about five years or more? What about three years or more?

What about less than a year? Would that make it OK? Please respond with your deportation decision.

Dear Dianne Feinstein

Dear Dianne,
The next time young people approach you about policy making, don’t lecture them about how great you are. You sound like an orange-colored Republican.

Furthermore, before arguing for the need to compromise, tell us how much money you take from oil companies.


Payback

Trump discovered that Andrew McCabe was not loyal to him, so he fired McCabe two days before his fiftieth birthday. According to various news accounts, McCabe lost early-retirement benefits that he would have been eligible for at age 50. But that is not the point, here.

The point is that you gotta love McCabe’s payback. The Threat is a tell-all book based on contemporaneous notes of conversations with the first orange-colored president. It is the perfect payback to the man who failed to see the obvious–you don’t fire a federal employee two days before he is eligible for benefits earned during more than twenty years of service. Nobody does that, except someone who cares only about himself and who is a threat to all that is good in our country.